Posts tagged standing desk

Office Work Habits: Desk Habits

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For many, sitting at a desk for work is unavoidable. A desk that is appropriately adjusted in addition to being well designed is an important part of an ergonomic workstation. A well-made desk should provide proper clearance for your legs, minimize awkward exertions and postures, and allow for proper placement of computer accessories.

A desk that isn’t properly set up or well designed can cause shoulder, back, and neck pain, which can lead to discomfort and performance inefficiencies. Generalized fatigue and contact stress are also a result of a poorly designed desk and the inability to change working positions.

Follow this ergonomic guide to avoid unnecessary strain and pain:

  • Frequently used devices (phones, keyboards, and mouse) should be within comfortable reaching distance.
  • Work surface depth should allow the monitor to be viewed at a distance of at least 20 inches.
  • If necessary, remove center drawers or insert stable risers under table legs to create clearance for your thighs and legs.
  • Use a height-adjustable desk, such as a Standing Desk, to have the ability to change working positions from sitting to standing throughout the day.
  • Standing up from your desk every hour for 2 – 3 minutes can help reverse the negative effects of sitting all day.

For more information on Ergonomic workstations and solutions, be sure to follow us on Facebook and Twitter, or visit your local Relax The Back store to receive a custom adjustment of the proper Ergonomic workstation.

 

Office Stretches

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Sitting for long periods of time can cause key muscles in the body to become tight and ultimately weak. Here are some tips to get moving in the office:

  • Think and work on your feet: Standing while working helps promote increased circulation, mental alertness, core strength, and relieves stress on your back and legs for a productive, pain-free workday. Our Sit-to-Stand desk quickly, quietly, and conveniently converts from a low of 26” to a high of 55” for flexibility in work habits.
  • Take stretch breaks: Take hourly stretch breaks, focusing on leg and feet stretches right at your desk. Try standing on tiptoe or on one leg, and do small lounges to work the calf muscles and knees.
  • Walk the talk: Instead of emailing a coworker who’s nearby, walk to his or her desk to discuss in-person or suggest a mobile meeting where you walk and talk.
  • Climb: Ditch the elevator, and take the stairs wherever possible. Stair climbing is a vigorous activity that counteracts the slowdown of metabolic activity that happens when seated.

In addition to these activities, try these great stretches to counteract the effects of prolonged sitting. Jeremy Shore from Livestrong.com shows you a few easy and effective office stretching techniques.